Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

News from CDC Sleep Front


Each month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention posts a report on www.nsart.org of recent data taken from its national and state surveillance databases. CDC has developed and implemented new sleep questions in its public health surveillance systems to increase public awareness of sleep health and sleep disorders and their impact on health. These monthly reports highlight geographic and racial/ethnic disparities in sleep health as well as relationships between insufficient sleep and chronic disease, health risk behaviors, and other outcomes.

January 2013

Age-adjusteda percentage of adults aged 20 years or older reporting sleep-related difficulty performing employed or volunteer work, by race/ethnicity—National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), United States, 2005–2008 (N = 10,896).

%b (95% Clc)
Total 8.6 (7.9 – 9.4)
Race/ethnicity
White, non-Hispanic 9.1 (8.1 – 10.0)
Black, non-Hispanic 8.7 (7.4 – 10.0)
Mexican American 4.9 (4.1 – 5.7)
Otherd 9.3 (7.3 – 11.4)

aEstimates are age-adjusted by using the projected 2000 U.S. population as the standard population and by using the following 3 age groups: 20–39 years, 40–59 years, and ≥60 years.
bWeighted percentage.
cConfidence interval.
dIncludes other Hispanics, other race/ethnicities, multiracial, and missing race/ethnicity.

As part of the NHANES Sleep Disorders Questionnaire, survey participants were asked, “Do you have difficulty performing employed or volunteer work because you are sleepy or tired?” Among U.S. adults aged 20 years or older, 8.6% reported sleep-related difficulty performing employed or volunteer work. Mexican Americans were significantly less likely to report this sleep-related difficulty (4.9%) than other racial or ethnic groups (approximately 9%).

Source: CDC. Effect of short sleep duration on daily activities—United States, 2005–2008. MMWR 2011;60:239–242. Available at www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6008a3.htm.

December 2012

Age-adjusteda percentage of adults aged 20 years or older reporting sleep-related difficulty remembering things, by education level—National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), United States, 2005–2008 (N = 10,896).

%b (95% Clc)
Total 18.2 (17.2-19.3)
Education level
Less then high school diploma 20.8 (18.5-23.2)
High school diploma 18.9 (17.0-20.8)
At least some college 17.0 (15.7-18.2)

aEstimates are age-adjusted by using the projected 2000 U.S. population as the standard population and by using the following 3 age groups: 20–39 years, 40–59 years, and ≥60 years.
bWeighted percentage.
cConfidence interval.

As part of the NHANES Sleep Disorders Questionnaire, survey participants were asked, “Do you generally have difficulty remembering things because you feel sleepy or tired?” Among U.S. adults aged 20 years or older, 18.2% reported sleep-related difficulty remembering things. Respondents with less than a high school diploma were more likely (20.8%) to report this difficulty than those with at least some college education (17.0%).

Source: CDC. Effect of short sleep duration on daily activities—United States, 2005–2008. MMWR 2011;60:239–242. Available at www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6008a3.htm.

November 2012

Age-adjusteda percentage of adults reporting nodding off or falling asleep while driving in the preceding 30 days, by race/ethnicity—Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 12 states, 2009 (N = 71,578).

%b (95% CIc)
Total 4.7 (4.2–5.1)
Race/ethnicity
White, non-Hispanic 3.2 (2.8–3.6)
Black, non-Hispanic 6.5 (5.1–7.9)
Hispanic 6.3 (5.3–7.3)
Other, non-Hispanicd 7.2 (5.1–9.3)

aAge-adjusted to the 2000 projected U.S. population.
bWeighted percentage.
cConfidence interval.
dAsian, Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, American Indian or Alaska Native, and multiracial.

As part of an optional BRFSS sleep module, adults in 12 states were asked, “During the past 30 days, have you ever nodded off or fallen asleep, even just for a brief moment, while driving?” The percentage of respondents who reported nodding off or falling asleep while driving in the preceding 30 days varied by age and was lower (3.2%) for non-Hispanic white respondents compared with all other racial or ethnic groups.

The 12 states that administered the BRFSS sleep module in 2009 were California, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, Texas, and Wyoming.

Source: CDC. Unhealthy sleep-related behaviors—12 states, 2009. MMWR 2011;60:233–238. Available at www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6008a2.htm.

October 2012

Percentage of adults who reported unintentionally falling asleep during the day at least 1 day in the preceding 30 days, by age group—Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 12 states, 2009 (N = 74,063).

%a (95% CIb)
Total 37.9 (37.1–38.7)
Age group (y)
     18–24 43.7 (40.4–47.1)
     25–34 36.1 (34.0–38.2)
     35–44 34.0 (32.3–35.6)
     45–54 35.3 (33.8–36.7)
     55–64 36.5 (35.0–38.0)
     ≥65 44.6 (43.4–45.9)

aWeighted percentage.
bConfidence interval.

As part of an optional BRFSS sleep module, adults in 12 states were asked, “During the past 30 days, for about how many days did you find yourself unintentionally falling asleep during the day?” Adults aged 18–24 years (43.7%) or 65 years or older (44.6%) were more likely to report unintentionally falling asleep during the day at least 1 day in the preceding 30 days than any other age group.

The 12 states that administered the BRFSS sleep module in 2009 were California, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, Texas, and Wyoming.

Source: CDC. Unhealthy sleep-related behaviors—12 states, 2009. MMWR 2011;60:233–238.
Available at www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6008a2.htm.

September 2012

Sleep Data from CDC

Age-adjusteda percentage of adults reporting certain sleep-related behaviors, by amount of sleepb — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 12 states, 2009.

CDC_September

a Age adjusted to the 2000 projected US population.
b On average, during a 24-hour period.
c 95% confidence interval.

As part of an optional BRFSS sleep module, adults in 12 states were asked, “On average, how many hours of sleep do you get in a 24-hour period? Think about the time you actually spend sleeping or napping, not just the amount of sleep you think you should get.” “Do you snore? (or told that you snore by spouse or someone else.)” “During the past 30 days, for about how many days did you find yourself unintentionally falling asleep during the day?” and “During the past 30 days, have you ever nodded off or fallen asleep, even just for a brief moment, while driving?” Respondents who reported sleeping less than 7 hours on average were more likely to report snoring (51.4% versus 46.0%), unintentionally falling asleep during the day at least 1 day in the preceding 30 days (46.2% versus 33.2%), and nodding off or falling asleep while driving in the preceding 30 days (7.3% versus 3.0%.)

The 12 states that administered the BRFSS sleep module in 2009 were California, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, Texas, and Wyoming.

Source: CDC. Unhealthy sleep-related behaviors—12 states, 2009. MMWR 2011;60:233–238. Available at www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6008a2.htm.

August 2012

Sleep Data from CDC

Age-adjusted percentage1 of adults reporting sleeping on average less than 7 hours in a 24-hour period, by race/ethnicity—Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 12 states, 2009 (N = 74,571)


%

(95% CI2)

Total

35.3

(34.5-36.1)

Race/Ethnicity

White, non-Hispanic

34.9

(33.9-35.9)

Black, non-Hispanic

48.3

(45.7-51.0)

Hispanic

33.0

(31.2-34.8)

Other, non-Hispanic3

38.7

(35.8-41.5)

1 Weighted percentage.
2 Confidence interval.
3 Asian, Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, American Indian or Alaska Native, and multiracial.

As part of an optional BRFSS sleep module, adults in 12 states were asked, “On average, how many hours of sleep do you get in a 24-hour period? Think about the time you actually spend sleeping or napping, not just the amount of sleep you think you should get.” The percentage of respondents who reported sleeping less than 7 hours on average varied by race/ethnicity. Non-Hispanic blacks (48.3%) and non-Hispanic persons of other races (38.7%) reported sleeping less than 7 hours more often than non-Hispanic whites (34.9%) and Hispanics (33%).

The 12 states that administered the BRFSS sleep module in 2009 were California, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, Texas, and Wyoming.

Source: CDC. Unhealthy sleep-related behaviors—12 states, 2009. MMWR 2011;60:233–238. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6008a2.htm.

July 2012

Sleep Data from CDC

Age-adjusted1 and age-specific percentage of adults aged ≥20 years reporting sleep-related difficulty remembering things—National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), United States, 2005–2008.

No.2

%

(95% CI3)

Total

10,896

18.2

(17.2–19.3)

Sex

Men

5,291

15.0

(13.8–16.2)

Women

5,605

21.4

(19.7–23.0)

Age group (years)

20–39

3,830

18.4

(16.9–19.9)

40–59

3,350

20.3

(18.6–22.1)

≥60

3,716

14.7

(13.0–16.3)

1 Estimates are age-adjusted using the projected 2000 U.S. population as the standard population and using the following three age groups: 20–39 years, 40–59 years, and ≥60 years.
2 Unweighted sample.
3 Confidence interval.

As part of the NHANES Sleep Disorders Questionnaire, survey participants were asked, “Do you generally have difficulty remembering things because you feel sleepy or tired?” Among U.S. adults aged ≥20 years, 18.2% reported sleep-related difficulty remembering things. Women were more likely than men to report this sleep-related difficulty (21.4% vs. 15.0%). Respondents aged ≥60 years were less likely (14.7%) to report this difficulty than those who were aged 20–39 years (18.4%) or 40–59 years (20.3%).

Source: CDC. Effect of short sleep duration on daily activities—United States, 2005–2008. MMWR 2011;60:239–242. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6008a3.htm.

June 2012

Sleep Data from CDC

Age-adjusted1 percentage of adults reporting snoring by marital status—Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 12 states, 2009.

No.2

%3

(95% CI4)
Total

74,571

48.0

(47.2–48.8)
Marital status

Married

42,965

49.5

(47.9–51.1)
Divorced/Widowed/Separated

21,199

46.4

(43.0–49.9)
Never married

8,590

43.5

(41.3–45.7)
Member of unmarried couple

1,638

51.6

(47.4–55.8)

1 Age-adjusted to the 2000 projected U.S. population.
2 Unweighted sample.
3 Weighted percentage.
4 Confidence interval.

As part of an optional BRFSS sleep module, adults in 12 states were asked, “Do you snore (or told that you snore by spouse or someone else)?” Snoring was reported by 48.0% of respondents. Never married respondents were less likely to report snoring (43.5%) than respondents who were married (49.5%) or who were a member of an unmarried couple (51.6%).

The 12 states that administered the BRFSS sleep module in 2009 were California, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, Texas, and Wyoming.

Source: CDC. Unhealthy sleep-related behaviors—12 states, 2009. MMWR 2011;60:233–238. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6008a2.htm.

May 2012

Sleep Data from CDC

Age-adjusted1 and age-specific percentage of adults aged ≥20 years reporting sleep-related difficulty performing employed or volunteer work, by sex and age group—National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), United States, 2005–2008.

No.2

%

(95% CI3)

Total

10,896

8.6

(7.9–9.4)

Sex

Men

5,291

7.8

(6.9–8.8)

Women

5,605

9.5

(8.5–10.5)

Age group (yrs)

20–39

3,830

10.3

(8.8–11.9)

40–59

3,350

10.0

(8.7–11.3)

≥60

3,716

3.5

(2.7–4.3)

1 Estimates are age-adjusted using the projected 2000 U.S. population as the standard population and using the following three age groups: 20–39 years, 40–59 years, and ≥60 years.
2 Unweighted sample.
3 Confidence interval.

As part of the NHANES Sleep Disorders Questionnaire, survey participants were asked, “Do you have difficulty performing employed or volunteer work because you are sleepy or tired?” Among U.S. adults aged ≥20 years, 8.6% reported sleep-related difficulty performing employed or volunteer work. Adults aged ≥60 years were significantly less likely to report this sleep-related difficulty (3.5%) than adults aged <60 years (approximately 10%). There was no significant difference between men and women in the percentage of respondents who reported this sleep-related difficulty.

Source: CDC. Effect of short sleep duration on daily activities—United States, 2005–2008. MMWR 2011;60:239–242. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6008a3.htm.

April 2012

Sleep Data from CDC

Age-adjusted1 percentage of adults reporting sleeping on average <7 hours in a 24-hour period by employment status—Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 12 states, 2009.

No.2

%3

(95% CI4)

Total

74,571

35.3

(34.5–36.1)

Employment status

Employed

38,814

37.4

(36.2–38.5)

Unemployed

3,996

35.1

(32.2–38.0)

Retired

20,304

25.0

(16.8–33.2)

Unable to work

4,001

46.4

(41.2–51.5)

Homemaker/Student

7,134

30.8

(28.9–32.8)

1 Age-adjusted to the 2000 projected U.S. population.
2 Unweighted sample.
3 Weighted percentage.
4 Confidence interval.

As part of an optional BRFSS sleep module, adults in 12 states were asked, “On average, how many hours of sleep do you get in a 24-hour period? Think about the time you actually spend sleeping or napping, not just the amount of sleep you think you should get.” The percentage of respondents who reported sleeping <7 hours on average varied by employment status and was highest for respondents who were unable to work (46.4%) and was lower for retired  respondents (25.0%) and homemakers/students (30.8%) compared to employed respondents (37.4%).

The 12 states that administered the BRFSS sleep module in 2009 were California, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, Texas, and Wyoming.

Source: CDC. Unhealthy sleep-related behaviors—12 states, 2009. MMWR 2011;60:233–238. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6008a2.htm.

March 2012

Sleep Data from CDC

Age-adjusted percentage of adults aged ≥20 years reporting sleep-related difficulty carrying out selected activities, by usual sleep duration—National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), United States, 2005–2008

1 Weighted percentage.
2 95% confidence interval.

As part of the NHANES Sleep Disorders Questionnaire, survey participants were asked, “How much sleep do you usually get at night on weekdays or workdays?” Participants were also asked whether they experienced each of a series of sleep-related difficulties (difficulty because sleepy or tired). The six sleep-related difficulties presented in the figure were significantly more likely for persons reporting <7 hours of sleep than for those reporting 7–9 hours of sleep.

Source: CDC. Effect of short sleep duration on daily activities—United States, 2005–2008. MMWR 2011;60:239–242. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6008a3.htm.

February 2012

Sleep Data from the CDC

Age-adjusted and age-specific percentage1 of adults reporting nodding off or falling asleep while driving in the preceding 30 days—Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 12 states, 2009.

No.2

%

(95% CI3)

Total

74,571

4.7

(4.2–5.1)

Sex

Men

28,330

5.8

(5.1–6.5)

Women

46,241

3.5

(3.1–3.9)

Age group (yrs)

18–24

2,330

4.5

(3.0–5.9)

25–34

6,637

7.2

(5.8–8.6)

35–44

10,645

5.7

(4.9–6.6)

45–54

15,407

3.9

(3.3–4.6)

55–64

16,385

3.1

(2.4–3.8)

≥65

23,167

2.0

(1.6–2.3)

1 Weighted percentage.
2 Unweighted sample.
3 Confidence interval.

As part of an optional BRFSS sleep module, adults in 12 states were asked, “During the past 30 days, have you ever nodded off or fallen asleep, even just for a brief moment, while driving?” The percentage of respondents who reported nodding off or falling asleep while driving in the preceding 30 days varied by age and was highest (7.2%) for respondents aged 25–34 years and lowest for respondents aged ≥65 years (2.0%). The percentage of respondents who reported this behavior was also higher among men (5.9%) compared to women (3.5%).

The 12 states that administered the BRFSS sleep module in 2009 were California, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, Texas, and Wyoming.

Source: CDC. Unhealthy sleep-related behaviors—12 states, 2009. MMWR 2011;60:233–238. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6008a2.htm.

January 2012

Sleep Data from the CDC

Age-specific and age-adjusted1 percentage of adults aged ≥20 years reporting sleep-related difficulty concentrating on things—National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), United States, 2005–2008.

No.2

%

(95% CI3)
Total

10,896

23.2

(22.0–24.5)
Gender

Men

5,291

20.2

(19.0–21.5)
Women

5,605

26.1

(24.4–27.8)
Age (Years)

20–39

3,830

25.1

(23.1–27.1)
40–59

3,350

24.5

(22.5–26.5)
≥60

3,716

18.0

(16.3–19.7)

1 Estimates are age adjusted using the projected 2000 U.S. population as the standard population and using three age groups: 20–39 years, 40–59 years, and ≥65 years.

2 Unweighted sample.

3 Confidence interval.

As part of the NHANES Sleep Disorders Questionnaire, survey participants were asked, “Do you have difficulty concentrating on the things you do because you feel sleepy or tired?” Among U.S. adults aged ≥20 years, 23.2% reported sleep-related difficulty concentrating on things. Women were more likely than men to report this sleep-related difficulty (26.1% vs. 20.2%). Respondents aged ≥60 years were less likely (18.0%) to report this difficulty than those who were aged 20–39 years (25.1%) or 40–59 years (24.5%).

Source:     CDC. Effect of short sleep duration on daily activities—United States, 2005–2008. MMWR 2011;60:239–242. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6008a3.htm.

December 2011

Sleep Data from the CDC

Age-adjusted1 percentage of adults reporting unintentionally falling asleep during the day at least 1 day in the preceding 30 days by employment status—Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 12 states, 2009.

No.2

%3

(95% CI4)
Total

74,571

37.8

(37.0–38.5)
Employment status

Employed

38,814

33.5

(32.4–34.6)
Unemployed

3,996

44.0

(41.0–47.0)
Retired

20,304

27.3

(19.7–34.9)
Unable to work

4,001

57.3

(51.9–62.7)
Homemaker/Student

7,134

39.3

(37.3–41.4)

1 Age adjusted to the 2000 projected U.S. population.
2 Unweighted sample.
3 Weighted percentage.
4 Confidence interval.

As part of an optional BRFSS sleep module, adults in 12 states were asked, “During the past 30 days, for about how many days did you find yourself unintentionally falling asleep during the day?” Among all respondents, 37.8% reported unintentionally falling asleep during the day at least 1 day in the preceding 30 days. Reports of this behavior varied by employment status, from a low of 27.3% among retired persons to a high of 57.3% among respondents who were unable to work.

Source:     CDC. Unhealthy sleep-related behaviors—12 states, 2009. MMWR 2011;60:233–238. Available at
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6008a2.htm.

November 2011

Sleep Data from the CDC

Age-adjusted1 percentage of adults aged ≥20 years reporting short sleep duration (<7 hours on weekday or workday nights) by race/ethnicity—National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), United States, 2005–2008.

No.2

%

(95% CI3)
Total

10,896

37.1

(35.0–39.1)
Race/Ethnicity

White, non-Hispanic

5,246

34.5

(31.9–37.2)
Black, non-Hispanic

2,346

53.0

(51.0–54.9)
Mexican-American

2,034

35.2

(32.9–37.5)
Other4

1,270

41.7

(38.4–45.0)

1 Estimates are age adjusted using the projected 2000 U.S. population as the standard population and using three age groups: 20–39 years, 40–59 years, and ≥65 years.

2 Unweighted sample.

3 Confidence interval.

4 Includes other Hispanics, other race/ethnicities, multiracial, and missing race/ethnicity.

As part of the NHANES Sleep Disorders Questionnaire, survey participants were asked, “How much sleep do you usually get at night on weekdays or workdays?” Among U.S. adults aged ≥20 years, 37.1% reported a short sleep duration. Non-Hispanic blacks were more likely (53.0%) to report a short sleep duration compared to other race/ethnicities, while non-Hispanic whites and Mexican-Americans were least likely to report a short sleep duration (34.5% and 35.2%, respectively).

Source:     CDC. Effect of short sleep duration on daily activities—United States, 2005–2008. MMWR 2011;60:239–242. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6008a3.htm.

October 2011

Sleep Data from the CDC

Age-specific and age-adjusted1 percentage of adults reporting snoring—Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 12 states, 2009.

No.2

%3

(95% CI4)

Total

74,571

48.0

(47.2–48.8)

Sex

Men

28,330

56.5

(55.3–57.8)

Women

46,241

39.6

(38.7–40.6)

Age group (yrs)

18–24

2,330

25.6

(22.7–28.6)

25–34

6,637

39.6

(37.4–41.8)

35–44

10,645

51.0

(49.2–52.7)

45–54

15,407

59.3

(57.8–60.8)

55–64

16,385

62.4

(60.9–63.9)

≥65

23,167

50.5

(49.2–51.9)

1 Age adjusted to the 2000 projected U.S. population.

2 Unweighted sample.

3 Weighted percentage.

4 Confidence interval.

As part of an optional BRFSS sleep module, adults in 12 states were asked, “Do you snore? (or told that you snore by spouse or someone else.)” Snoring was reported by 48.0% of respondents. Men (56.5%) were more likely to report snoring than women (39.6%). The youngest respondents were least likely to report snoring (25.6% of persons aged 18–24 years).

Source:     CDC. Unhealthy sleep-related behaviors—12 states, 2009. MMWR 2011;60:233–238. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6008a2.htm.

September 2011

Sleep Data from the CDC

Distribution of sleep duration among adults aged ≥20 years—National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), United States, 2005–2008

1 Weighted percentage.

2 95% confidence interval.

As part of the NHANES Sleep Disorders Questionnaire, survey participants were asked, “How much sleep do you usually get at night on weekdays or workdays?” Among U.S. adults aged ≥20 years, 37.1% reported a short sleep duration (<7 hours on weekday or workday nights), 60.5% reported the 7–9 hours suggested by the National Sleep Foundation, and 2.4% reported >9 hours.

Source:     CDC. Effect of short sleep duration on daily activities—United States, 2005–2008. MMWR 2011;60:239–242. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6008a3.htm.

August 2011

Sleep Data from the CDC

Age-specific percentage1 of adults reporting sleeping on average <7 hours in a 24-hour period — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 12 states, 2009.

No.2

%

(95% CI3)

Total

74,571

35.3

(34.5–36.1)

Sex

Men

28,330

35.3

(34.2–36.5)

Women

46,241

35.2

(34.2–36.2)

Age group (yrs)

18–24

2,330

30.9

(27.8–33.9)

25–34

6,637

39.4

(37.3–41.6)

35–44

10,645

39.3

(37.7–41.0)

45–54

15,407

39.0

(37.6–40.5)

55–64

16,385

34.2

(32.7–35.7)

≥65

23,167

24.5

(23.4–25.6)

1 Weighted percentage.
2 Unweighted sample.
3 Confidence interval.

As part of an optional BRFSS sleep module, adults in 12 states were asked, “On average, how many hours of sleep do you get in a 24-hour period? Think about the time you actually spend sleeping or napping, not just the amount of sleep you think you should get.” The percentage of respondents who reported sleeping <7 hours on average varied by age and was highest (approximately 39%) for respondents aged 25-54 years and lowest for respondents aged ≥65 years (approximately 25%). There was no difference between men and women in the percentage of respondents who reported sleeping <7 hours.

Source:     CDC. Unhealthy sleep-related behaviors—12 states, 2009. MMWR 2011;60:233–238. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6008a2.htm.